There Was No Agreement The Great Powers A Treaty To Ban Nuclear Weapons

On 4 and 5 March, 127 governments, UN agencies, international organisations and members of civil society met in Oslo, Norway, to discuss the humanitarian consequences of the use of nuclear weapons. The first conference on the humanitarian impact of nuclear weapons concluded that Governments and humanitarian organizations would not be able to respond adequately to the detonation of a nuclear weapon. For nations parties, the Treaty prohibits the development, testing, production, stockpiling, deployment, transfer, use and threat of use of nuclear weapons, as well as the support and encouragement of prohibited activities. With regard to the nuclear-weapon States that accede to the Treaty, it provides a time frame for negotiations leading to the verified and irreversible abolition of their nuclear weapons programme. In May 2015, the Dutch House of Representatives adopted a non-binding proposal calling on the Dutch government to participate in the content of international discussions on an agreement to ban nuclear weapons without undermining the final result. [74] About a year later, in May 2016, the Dutch House of Representatives passed a similar proposal calling on the government to work towards “the international prohibition of nuclear weapons.” These demands were partially supported by at least one citizens` initiative. [75] This legislation made it politically unacceptable for the Dutch government to officially avoid participation in the TPNW negotiations and not to vote like the rest of NATO and the nuclear-weapon states in the world. . . .